Spring

Tuolumne Meadows Virtual Hike

Tuolumne Meadows, located at 8500 ft in Yosemite National Park, is an iconic example of a high-elevation Sierra Nevada meadow system. Part of the headwaters of the Tuolumne River watershed, the broad U-shaped valley is surrounded by granitic domes and peaks shaped by past glacial processes. The Tuolumne River winds through the meadow complex, fed by snowmelt from permanent snowfields on Mt. Dana and Mt. Lyell. This virtual hike takes you along the Tuolumne River through the main Tuolumne Meadow complex. The hike begins on top of Lembert Dome, with a view overlooking the meadow complex. From there you can jump down to the hike along the river, which starts at stop 1 upstream of the Highway 120 and extends for approximately 3 miles downstream to the base of the meadow at stop 49. An interpretive trail with informative videos that are based on the real interpretive trail signs located in the park can be found between stops 10 and 24.

California Water Myths

In collaboration with the Public Policy Institute of California and other researchers, the Center prepared California Water Myths—a report highlighting eight common water myths, focusing on water supply, ecosystems and legal and governance issues. In providing information to combat these myths, the study establishes a more informed approach to water policy and management in California.

California Water Primer

The following books and readings will provide a very good understanding of general water issues in California. We don't endorse everything they say, but most educated water wonks in California will have read most of them.

California Water Policy Seminar Series: Floods

The Center for Watershed Sciences is hosting a weekly series of public speakers on California water policy in response to floods this winter, beginning Jan. 23. This course examines flooding in national and California water policy, including: large scale and small scale flood planning; legal issues surrounding flooding; flood mitigation; environmental impacts to and from flooding; including ecosystem restoration, flood mitigation, and climate change. Speakers are tentative.

California Water Course

The California Water Course, organized by the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, is an orientation to water management and policy in California. This online course should give students a basic understanding of management and policy aspects of California's water system, as an example of large water resource systems more generally.

Ecogeomorphology: Tuolumne River 2016

This course seeks to introduce advanced undergraduate students to multidisciplinary collaborative watershed and stream analysis through combined laboratory and field study of a selected stream system. Topics relating to management of stream systems will be discussed throughout with emphasis on the management of Sierra Nevada rivers in California. Students from diverse backgrounds will work in interdisciplinary research teams to collect and analyze field data from the Tuolumne River system. These teams will present results of the field studies in the form written reports due at the end of the class. Data collection will focus on key ecological issues relevant to management within the watershed such as: what are the impacts of regulated flow regimes on aquatic biota, what are the impacts from the recent Rim fire, and what long-term monitoring data are needed to address on-going conservation strategies in the face of climate change?

Ecogeomorphology: Tuolumne River 2015

An extension of previous Ecogeomorphology classes, this class is a field-based multidisciplinary study of the ecology, geomorphology and management of rivers in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, with a focus on the Tuolumne River watershed. Open to upper-division undergraduate students, the course brings together students from a range of biological and physical sciences and engineering backgrounds to address conservation and management issues in California watersheds.

Ecogeomorphology: Tuolumne River 2014

An extension of previous ecogeomorphology classes, this class is a field-based multidisciplinary study of the ecology, geomorphology and management of rivers in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, with a focus on the Tuolumne River watershed. Open to upper-division undergraduate students, the course brings together students from a range of biological and physical sciences and engineering backgrounds to address conservation and management issues in California watersheds.

Ecology and Management of Sierra Nevada Rivers 2013

This course seeks to introduce advanced undergraduate and early graduate students to multidisciplinary collaborative watershed and stream analysis through combined laboratory and field study of a selected stream system. Topics relating to management of stream systems will be discussed throughout with emphasis on the management of Sierra Nevada rivers in California. Students from diverse backgrounds will work in cooperative interdisciplinary research teams to collect and analyze field data from the Tuolumne River system. These teams will present the collection and results of the field data in the form of a 5-minute video due at the end of the class. Data collection will focus on key ecological issues relevant to management within the watershed: what are the impacts of regulated flow regimes on aquatic biota in the Tuolumne River watershed and what long-term monitoring data are needed to address on-going conservation strategies in the face of climate change?

Ecogeomorphology: Chilko-Chilcotin-Fraser Rivers 2011

This year's ecogeomorphology course studied the headwater lakes and river systems of the Chilko-Chilcotin River system in British Columbia, Canada. The course was focused on developing a conceptual model that tied important physical and biological processes together based on levels of importance and understanding. To compliment the model, eleven technical chapters provided details in disciplines ranging from tectonics and glaciers to biological nitrogen cycling. An interactive map identifies locations of field work activities, interesting islands, and campsites. And of course there are many field logs (Flogs) and photos to enlighten and entertain the casual viewer.